FFIM

FFIM is a non-profit organization devoted to promoting and preserving Maine's fisheries
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PostPosted: March 22nd, 2019, 10:00 am 
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Joined: October 16th, 2002, 12:00 am
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Location: Windham
I typically read here everyday briefly, but may have missed it......surprised there has been no talk of this project?

My personal feeling is that this is a real bad deal for Maine, and I’m hoping the increasing traction by the local communities can actual make a difference here. It’s one of the largest unspoiled sections of wilderness in Maine.

https://www.corridorno.com/

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PostPosted: March 22nd, 2019, 10:40 am 
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There has been a lot of discussion at TU meetings, etc... I think most folks are keeping their powder dry for the public hearings next month. April 2nd and April 4th are both opportunities for folks to give their thoughts on the project.

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PostPosted: March 22nd, 2019, 11:52 am 
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Once again, Maine being treated like a third world country...


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PostPosted: March 22nd, 2019, 12:13 pm 
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Hunter wrote:
There has been a lot of discussion at TU meetings, etc... I think most folks are keeping their powder dry for the public hearings next month. April 2nd and April 4th are both opportunities for folks to give their thoughts on the project.


“Don’t wait for the perfect shot to present itself, because it may never come” was once told to me by an accomplished hunter.

There has been considerable opportunities for citizens to voice their concerns at town hearings, editorials and opinion pieces are being published daily, etc.

Franklin county commissioners have had their ears open to the public, and just yanked their support, and looks like a possible bill being presented to slow this.

Fire away any chance you get.

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PostPosted: March 22nd, 2019, 12:42 pm 
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Folks are, but whereas certain groups have filed as intervenors- they’re officers are not allowed to testify at the public hearings. Instead, they’re limited to testifying at their scheduled intervenor times per the established rules at the PUC.

That doesn’t preclude speaking at non-PUC events, etc... and a lot of folks are speaking up. Just not on FFIM much. But there is a lot going on out there.

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PostPosted: March 22nd, 2019, 4:40 pm 
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Just surprised it hasn’t gained any traction here for discussion.

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PostPosted: March 24th, 2019, 11:58 am 
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Location: Manchester, ME
Public hearings in the evenings next Tuesday and Thursday, Lincoln Auditorium, UMaine Farmington.



TIME & PLACE: The hearing is from Monday, April 1 through Friday, April 5, 2019, at the
University of Maine at Farmington, as specified below. On April 2, 2019, only, the Department will
hold the hearing jointly with the Commission. The joint portion of the hearing, including the
evening session, will focus on the Commission’s review criteria related to potential impacts to
scenic character and existing uses and the alternatives analysis. The rest of the hearing is for the
Department to receive testimony related to all of the hearing topics listed above.
All locations are on the University of Maine at Farmington campus (111 South Street,
Farmington, Maine 04938).
Monday, 4/1/2019, North Dining Hall, 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (DEP)
Tuesday, 4/2/2019, North Dining Hall, 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (DEP & LUPC*)
Tuesday, 4/2/2019, Lincoln Auditorium, 6:00 p.m. – end time to be determined by Presiding Officer
(DEP & LUPC)
Wednesday, 4/3/2019, North Dining Hall, 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (DEP)
Thursday, 4/4/2019, Lincoln Auditorium, 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (DEP)
Thursday, 4/4/2019, Lincoln Auditorium, 6:00 p.m. – end time to be determined by Presiding
Officer (DEP)
Friday, 4/5/2019, North Dining Hall, 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (DEP)


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PostPosted: March 24th, 2019, 3:54 pm 
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Joined: July 23rd, 2012, 12:11 pm
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Location: New Hampshire
In NH the project was known as Northern Pass. It had a ton of opposition and was "finally" defeated by a unanimous vote of the state site evaluation committee. My understanding is that there is some type of review, but the prospects for a reversal are small. The present NH Governor is a big business/big utility guy and was in favor, but the people who would have been impacted in the Northern part of the state fought hard (Northern pass kiss my ass signs all over!) and it was defeated. I suspect the proposal in Maine is the result of NH saying no.


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PostPosted: March 24th, 2019, 5:36 pm 
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Location: Plymouth, ME
kmudgn wrote:
In NH the project was known as Northern Pass. It had a ton of opposition and was "finally" defeated by a unanimous vote of the state site evaluation committee. My understanding is that there is some type of review, but the prospects for a reversal are small. The present NH Governor is a big business/big utility guy and was in favor, but the people who would have been impacted in the Northern part of the state fought hard (Northern pass kiss my ass signs all over!) and it was defeated. I suspect the proposal in Maine is the result of NH saying no.


That's encouraging to hear. Especially since I only hear negative reaction to the project from everyone I know (except the Governor) AND YET, friends seem resigned to the idea that it's a foregone conclusion. I applaud the notion that the State needs to look for new ways to flourish, but this CMP boondoggle ain't it.


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PostPosted: March 26th, 2019, 9:23 am 
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so with the town of Farmington voting strongly against it ,and other towns coming forward as against it ,and even another town withdrawing its support !!

is it possible that the tide is turning ?? ..lets hope so

basically every municipality on either side and down the middle of the proposed corridor has said NO ..so it makes you wonder how PUC could approve and still not be hung out to dry ?/


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PostPosted: March 28th, 2019, 9:14 pm 
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Kmudgn
You are correct on the job was called the Northern Pass and was to come through NH. The funny thing is the inflation of the jobs numbers. Well, probably not inflated as much as smoke and mirrors. Yes that many people may work from beginning to end. But many from engineering to administration may be handled elsewhere. I think they are calling it 3200-3400 jobs. As for the pure construction maybe at tops 300-400 construction jobs. Probably 200-300 engineers, inspector spies, and office types.Yes local services for fuel, food, transportation etc. If lucky maybe 50-70 percent of the material will be made in America. The rest comes from China. In the old days we would climb the structures, yes some roads, more like skidded trails were into the structures. Now days they literally build roads to get 10-125' bucket trucks and manliest into each structure so the linemen can do there work just as if they were on the street. Plenty of the roads are made from timber pads layed down as a 12-15' wide wooden highway, made from 12' square timbers. Most are picked up but I see a lot of places where they get left behind. Much of the silt control is actually better now than in the old days as long as it is maintained. Most of it is biodegradable. But it is still through an area that really will be degraded just the same and environmental harm is always just a mishap away.

Ron

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PostPosted: March 29th, 2019, 3:10 pm 
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Location: Northern Vermont
kmudgn wrote:
In NH the project was known as Northern Pass. It had a ton of opposition and was "finally" defeated by a unanimous vote of the state site evaluation committee. My understanding is that there is some type of review, but the prospects for a reversal are small. The present NH Governor is a big business/big utility guy and was in favor, but the people who would have been impacted in the Northern part of the state fought hard (Northern pass kiss my ass signs all over!) and it was defeated. I suspect the proposal in Maine is the result of NH saying no.


You are absolutely correct that the current CMP proposal is a result of the NH/Northern Pass project hitting a wall.

The whole thing is being driven by the desire on the part of MA to have a portfolio of electrical power sources that is carbon free. That is a good thing although there are negative trade offs due to the impact of incentivizing continued hydro development in Quebec and the impact of the transmission corridor to bring Quebec hydro (and wind) power to MA. When it comes to electrical generation there is, IMO, no perfect solution regardless of the technology.

There is an existing transmission corridor across the northeast corner of VT (the so-called Northeast Kingdom") that was developed in the 1980s with a big DC line that transmits power from Quebec to a converter station in NH and then on to southern New England. There was a proposal to expand that corridor and put up another set of conductors to transmit the new slug of power MA wants to get. For some reasons the powers to be in MA went with the CMP proposal instead (their first preference was the NH Northern Pass project).


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PostPosted: April 3rd, 2019, 10:23 pm 
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Joined: December 5th, 2001, 1:00 am
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Location: Manchester, ME
To the top. Last chance for public comment on this project is tomorrow night in Farmington at UMF.


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