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PostPosted: October 30th, 2013, 8:58 pm 
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Maine’s elver fishery to face harvest cuts in 2014

PORTLAND — Maine’s lucrative glass eel fishery will be allowed to remain open next year as long as state officials devise a plan to cut its 2014 catch by at least 25 percent, regulators agreed Wednesday.

http://www.pressherald.com/news/Maine_s ... ions_.html


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PostPosted: November 3rd, 2013, 10:42 am 
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Location: Brunswick
'bout time!

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PostPosted: November 5th, 2013, 2:37 pm 
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I'm all in favor of reducing the elver fishery. It seems every other place recognizes eels need more protection but Maine. As I understand it the elvers are sold live and then shipped to be raised to market weight. People are always saying the way to economic development is "value added " to a resource, not just the export of the raw material. Has anyone looked into raising the elvers here in Maine? The total take could be less, yet the economic benefit amounting to the same. Seems like a win, win. Any thoughts?


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PostPosted: December 13th, 2013, 1:48 am 
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I'm sure if you raised them here in Maine they'd try to stop it once you started making big money.

I'm all for protection of things if its warranted, but I'm also a firm believer in consumptive use. I saw this happening a few years ago when the price of elvers started going up. There is not a state or federal agency that won't step in and and put things to a cease once they see that much money being exchanged. You can believe whatever science it is that they supposedly have, but a reduction in harvest is not about the science. Its about the money plain and simple. I collected data for National Marine Fisheries aboard groudfish boats, both draggers and gillnetters, and then scallop boats for six years spending roughly 125 nights at sea a year. I watched new regulation after new regulation go into effect each year and I can't think of one that my data, thousands upon thousands of pages, ever would of justified. Its ashame really what the commercial fisheries have become in the Northeast and what has happened to Maine's working waterfronts. The winter shrimp fishery closing down is just as much a tragedy and crazy from what I saw while abboard some of those boats.

Does anybody have any real data on why a harvest reduction is justified?

The sad thing is it will be reduced for hard working mainers, and money will be lost to the Maine economy, but the tribes will still be able to harvest and do what they want because they can pretty much do what they want in this country.

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PostPosted: December 13th, 2013, 5:46 pm 
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Joined: October 1st, 2006, 12:00 am
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Location: Portland, ME
I believe catch reduction can be justified. It's not science, but two years ago during shrimp season I could go to any Hannaford and buy it, $4/pound. Last year the technical committee suggested not having a season, because there were so few shrimp around. I called Harbor Fish during last year's season, and they told me a boat was coming in next day and to come down about 3 PM. I did, and by 4:30 the shrimp had sold out. There just weren't many around, is what you heard.

The fishermen have indeed worked hard. Time to give the shrimp a chance to catch up.

As to Dan's suggestion of a grow-out of elvers in Maine, I don't know of anyone ever trying. The Japanese market is the most lucrative, and tends to be picky about freshness. The current route is for the elvers to travel to China or Viet Nam and grow out in ponds, then go to Japan. Two limitations I can foresee for elver maturation here is the added cost of transporting a full grown eel compared to a glass eel, and getting it there quickly enough.

Another consideration is the ponds for grow out. There is concern Thailand, particularly, is taking out mangroves (which help prevent erosion and mitigate wave action) to create areas to grow out shrimp. Is poor old China Lake ready for an eel farm?


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PostPosted: December 17th, 2013, 9:18 am 
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Joined: December 3rd, 2001, 1:00 am
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Location: whitefield
somewhere the sea urchins are jealous.....


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