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 Post subject: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 27th, 2018, 10:03 am 
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FFIMer

Joined: August 26th, 2018, 12:56 pm
Posts: 3
Hi everyone, I am a college student at UMF who recently got into fly fishing. I was wondering what flies people had success with in smaller trout ponds in the fall. I hear people do well with black buggers as leaches and some bright colored streamers, letting them sink from a canoe and retrieving very slowly. I know a little bit about dry flies and nymphing in the spring, but if anyone has any fall advice that would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you!


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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 27th, 2018, 5:45 pm 
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Joined: December 4th, 2001, 1:00 am
Posts: 5338
Location: Near the tying bench
I don’t pond fish often, but have had very good luck on partridge and orange soft hackle wets in the fall. Others like dunked orange hoppers. Good luck!

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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 27th, 2018, 5:58 pm 
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Joined: February 14th, 2007, 1:00 am
Posts: 1385
Location: New Hampshire
White marabou streamers with a little orange or red in them... fish them deep.

I am also more help in Rivers, where red Bradford, Black stone flies, and small olive nymphs are my “go tos”.

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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 27th, 2018, 7:12 pm 
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Joined: December 5th, 2001, 1:00 am
Posts: 5310
Location: Manchester, ME
Orange muddlers, wet and dry. Ants. Larger bead head hare's ear nymphs.


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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 27th, 2018, 7:30 pm 
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Joined: September 28th, 2003, 12:00 am
Posts: 2628
"Larger bead head hare's ear nymphs."
Jeff,
Is that hare's ear nymphs with larger beads or overall larger bead head hare's ear nymphs.

Ron

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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 27th, 2018, 8:09 pm 
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Joined: June 16th, 2005, 12:00 am
Posts: 179
Location: Greenwood, ME
jrouss22 wrote:
Hi everyone, I am a college student at UMF who recently got into fly fishing. I was wondering what flies people had success with in smaller trout ponds in the fall. I hear people do well with black buggers as leaches and some bright colored streamers, letting them sink from a canoe and retrieving very slowly. I know a little bit about dry flies and nymphing in the spring, but if anyone has any fall advice that would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you!


This question takes me back 20 years to when I was a student at UMF looking for advice on fly fishing in the area. Fortunately for me, Aardvark Outfitters was in its heyday and Bob Dionne was super generous with his time for poor college kids. Anyway, to answer your question, I always did well with hornbergs and muddlers are great attractor patterns in that area. Like I said, it was 20 years ago, but I did well with those two patterns on Kimball pond (about 20 minute drive from campus).


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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 27th, 2018, 9:31 pm 
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Joined: October 16th, 2002, 12:00 am
Posts: 5317
Location: Windham
I like small size 18 thread midges with a little flash, maybe a colored glass bead with the same color uni-wire ribbing. Typically low water in the rivers and clear. Places like the EO, Roach, GLS, Kennebago are sure to have pressure so I like small, long thin leaders, etc.

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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 28th, 2018, 10:07 am 
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FFIMer

Joined: April 27th, 2003, 12:00 am
Posts: 763
You are in a great area for some college classes while learning to fly fish. Get yourself a Gazetteer if you haven't already done so. Start at Farmington and look directly East. Then chart an 180 degree arch to the North and then to the West. Give your self an 1.5 to 2 hour drive within that arch and you will find Brookie and Salmon fishing that can be rewarding for the effort you put in. Ponds and rivers.


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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 29th, 2018, 5:26 pm 
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Joined: August 26th, 2018, 12:56 pm
Posts: 3
Hi everyone, thank you for all of the good advice with flies. Because some of you have lived in the area and even gone to school here, I was wondering if there were any other places you would recommend (or rather secrets you wouldn’t mind parting with)? I’ve been looking at Beal (trout) pond but don’t really have any idea where to begin in this area.

Thank you all so much!


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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 29th, 2018, 8:25 pm 
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Joined: April 27th, 2003, 12:00 am
Posts: 763
See the post above yours!


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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 30th, 2018, 5:15 pm 
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Joined: December 5th, 2001, 1:00 am
Posts: 5310
Location: Manchester, ME
Ron--Both.

I tie them on 3XL nymph hooks in 8-10-12. Copper or brass bead--appropriate size for hook. Fluffy bunny fur off the "cheeks" of a hare's mask for a tail, with a strand of two of flashabou on each side. Hare's ear abdomen, thick and scruggy. A turn or two of soft hackle. Peacock herl thorax.

I call it a fly, but on ponds, it fishes as a jig. Cast on a floating line, let it sink, and then hop it back to you with 10-12 inch slow strips, especially around the edge of weed beds, boulders, or ledge drop offs. Hits will come on the drop--pay attention.


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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 30th, 2018, 7:05 pm 
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Joined: August 26th, 2018, 12:56 pm
Posts: 3
AusableWulff wrote:
See the post above yours!


That sounds fair, I will have to do a lot of exploring!


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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 31st, 2018, 10:56 am 
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Joined: June 16th, 2005, 12:00 am
Posts: 179
Location: Greenwood, ME
Half of the fun for me and my buddies at UMF was just bouncing around in a ratty old Subaru trying to find the places that we saw in the Delorme. That said, I'll reiterate my suggestion of Kimball Pond. It's not a secret spot by any means, but it's great place to start. Farmington Falls was also a go-to spot for me when I lived up there. Again, it's not a secret spot and you're not going to pull trophies from it, but it's a good place to learn to fly fish (at least it was 20 years ago).


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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: August 31st, 2018, 9:55 pm 
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Joined: April 27th, 2003, 12:00 am
Posts: 763
One more thing. Stay in Farmington over the summer if you can. The fishing up there just starts getting good after classes end for the spring semester and the season closes only a month into the fall semester. That’s a lot of good fishing you would miss over the summer. In the area I suggested you can even find water with suitable temps for trout in the dog days of summer. Also the Androscoggin is a great smallmouth fishery, and smallies make good fun on the fly if temps get to high for salmonoids.


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 Post subject: Re: Fall Flies
PostPosted: September 1st, 2018, 7:06 am 
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Joined: April 1st, 2010, 10:35 am
Posts: 295
Location: flatland and Vienna Me.
. Like I said, it was 20 years ago, but I did well with those two patterns on Kimball pond (about 20 minute drive from campus).[/quote]


The fishing on Kimball went downhill after some idiot put sunfish in there so his grandchildren could catch fish.The sunfish must eat the nymphs because the Hex hatch went way down. But it's still a nice place and they do stock it.


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