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PostPosted: August 15th, 2017, 3:11 pm 
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Be wary of ticks (both 2 and 8 legged). I helped the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve with a fish passage improvement project on a local stream a few years back. The folks at the research station had been working on tick counts and relative abundance of Lyme disease in that area. It has a vary high percentage of Lyme disease infected ticks. Sawyer's Permithrin works well for treating pants to keep them at bay (and kill them, not sure what it does to you).

We'll have to chase stripers soon.

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PostPosted: August 15th, 2017, 6:09 pm 
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Location: Freeport, Maine
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What does the Presumpscot clay have to do with the trout?


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PostPosted: August 16th, 2017, 8:16 am 
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Hunter wrote:
Be wary of ticks (both 2 and 8 legged). I helped the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve with a fish passage improvement project on a local stream a few years back. The folks at the research station had been working on tick counts and relative abundance of Lyme disease in that area. It has a vary high percentage of Lyme disease infected ticks. Sawyer's Permithrin works well for treating pants to keep them at bay (and kill them, not sure what it does to you).

We'll have to chase stripers soon.


Thanks for the tip on the ticks and I'm game for stripers - looking forward to the fall run!


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PostPosted: August 16th, 2017, 10:51 am 
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Brian Haddock wrote:
Hunter

What does the Presumpscot clay have to do with the trout?


A couple of things.

1) Trout eggs don't fair well in systems prone to movement of silt/clay in the water column as it interferes with oxygen transfer at the egg sac membrane. It's also hard on adults for similar reasons at the gill membrane. However- adults may use such systems for feeding forays (e.g., salters), where suitable spawning habitat is available upstream from the clay/silt formation.
2) Lack of granular spawning habitat in clay bed systems. Presumpscot formation clay is a sea-bed deposition feature- so is limited to very fine material that had been suspended in the water column during the glacial melt period. Typical max particle size is less than 1/8" in such material, and even then- sand is typically limited to thin layers within clay/silt formation. P-scot formation clay tends to be unconsolidated after you break through the crust- with the consistency of a jar of baby food. I once oversaw a boring in the Biddeford/Saco area where, after breaking through the 15 feet or so of 'crust' material the town is founded upon, the drillers had to hold onto the drill steel with wrenches to keep from losing it down the hole as it sank unassisted (all the way to 180 feet of depth). This is typical of P-scot formation clays.

Presumpscot formation clay is different than glacial till- which does contain coarse material in the soil matrix. If enough time has passed to wash enough fines from a glacial till bedded stream to allow the the silt/clay load to diminish and bed the stream with coarse material- trout habitat may be found. However- disturbance to such systems can cause a ripple effect that may impact trout permanently.

Clear as mud?

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PostPosted: August 17th, 2017, 7:58 am 
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Hunter wrote:
Brian Haddock wrote:
Hunter

What does the Presumpscot clay have to do with the trout?


A couple of things.

1) Trout eggs don't fair well in systems prone to movement of silt/clay in the water column as it interferes with oxygen transfer at the egg sac membrane. It's also hard on adults for similar reasons at the gill membrane. However- adults may use such systems for feeding forays (e.g., salters), where suitable spawning habitat is available upstream from the clay/silt formation.
2) Lack of granular spawning habitat in clay bed systems. Presumpscot formation clay is a sea-bed deposition feature- so is limited to very fine material that had been suspended in the water column during the glacial melt period. Typical max particle size is less than 1/8" in such material, and even then- sand is typically limited to thin layers within clay/silt formation. P-scot formation clay tends to be unconsolidated after you break through the crust- with the consistency of a jar of baby food. I once oversaw a boring in the Biddeford/Saco area where, after breaking through the 15 feet or so of 'crust' material the town is founded upon, the drillers had to hold onto the drill steel with wrenches to keep from losing it down the hole as it sank unassisted (all the way to 180 feet of depth). This is typical of P-scot formation clays.

Presumpscot formation clay is different than glacial till- which does contain coarse material in the soil matrix. If enough time has passed to wash enough fines from a glacial till bedded stream to allow the the silt/clay load to diminish and bed the stream with coarse material- trout habitat may be found. However- disturbance to such systems can cause a ripple effect that may impact trout permanently.

Clear as mud?


Check out the big brain on Brad!!! That's crazy on drill!


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PostPosted: August 17th, 2017, 7:28 pm 
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Thanks for the explanation. Your initial comments poked my curiosity because, as kids, we used to fish brooks that drained into the Presumpscot that had good natural reproduction, if the number of 4" trout were any indication. But I guess with clay, it's all about location, location, location?


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