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PostPosted: August 2nd, 2017, 8:11 pm 
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FFIMer

Joined: February 28th, 2017, 9:28 am
Posts: 4
Location: Baie-Comeau, Quebec, Canada
Last weekend I went fishing for 3 days on the Trinity river for the first time this summer. When I got to Baie-Trinité I was stunned by the low number of sea run brookies that went up the fish ladder and into the river... so far this summer there's 800 sea run brookies in the river. There was 2200 of them last year at the end of july... The atlantic salmon are also fewer this summer with 360 salmons so far. The river itself was also extremely low since we didn't had any rain for the last 3 weeks in the area. The Trinity river isn't a fast flowing torrent it's a slower river with deep pool so when the flow isn't high enough it gets extremely difficult to fish for atlantic salmon because the wet flies sink on the bottom instead of swinging across the pool...

Saturday morning I went to a pool where I know there's always some salmon hanging there. I casted dry flies for 6 hours and the only action I had was when a nice 15 pounds buck came up to look at my bomber for 1 second before going down again. At the end of the afternoon I went to another pool fishing for big brookies but I only caught small 4-5 inches salmon and brookies. I saw some salmon jumping but not a lot.

The next morning I went to the rouge-gorge pool, a good pool for sea run brookies and salmon but I targeted mainly the brookies. There was a lot of surface action and I spotted 3 nices brookies rising for small brown/cream spruce budworm butterflies. I casted a #16 elk hair caddis at the nearest fish and caught that nice 18 inches sea run brookies.

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after a nice fight I casted to another fish that was rising near me. He took the fly on the first cast and i saw that it was a big 3-4 pounds sea run brookie. The fish made a powerful run and I made a rookie mistake by putting too much pressure on the fly line and the tippet broke... After that I caught some smaller 12-13 inches sea run brookies in the same pool.

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At the end of the morning session I went back upstream to the same pool where I fished for salmon the day before. I casted 2 different bombers without any reaction from the fishes. That's when I tied on my famous small blue bomber. It's been my most productive dry fly over the last 3 years. I started casting and slowly made my way up to the spot where that 15 pounders rose to my fly the day before. As soon as the fly touched the water I saw a big head coming up, breaking the surface and taking my fly! I managed to wait 1,5 second and then I setted the hook. The salmon started to give violent headshake and it jumped 3 times out of the water as high as 6 feet up in the air!! After those jumps the salmon used the current a lot to fight and I constantly had to pull him out of the current and into the deadwater. When I felt that the salmon was beggining to run out of energy I took a moment to set my camera on a flat rock to take a pic. After that I brought the fish to me, grabbed the leader and managed to tail the fish! I caught a nice 15 pound male salmon! As I tried to take a picture the fish slipped out of my hands. I grabbed the leader to get him back but he gave a violent headshake at the same time and broke the tippet. He went back in the pool and I lost my precious blue bomber! Sorry no picture of that bad boy...

The next morning I went back to the rouge-gorge pool by 5 am and I rapidly spotted a small group of salmon in 2 feet of water at the head of the pool where flow was a little faster. I tried casting wet flies and bombers to those fish for 8 hours without any reaction at all. That's a good example of what atlantic salmon fishing is about most of the time...Sometimes it pays off to target some salmon and harass them until one of them is angry enough to attack the fly. But sometimes it doesn't!

About 1:00 pm I decided that I had enough and it was time to leave. To do so I had to cross the river so I decided to try to approach thoses salmons from behind to see how close I could get before they swim away. After 5 minutes of ninja wading I got to 5 feet behind the salmons! I could clearly see a 12 pounds female with 2 grilses.

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I had a great time on the Trinity river and the best part is that I still have 17 days left on my 20 days atlantic salmon fishing pass! I have a week off from job next week so i'll be camping by the river and fishing it with a friend for 8 consecutives days!!


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PostPosted: August 3rd, 2017, 8:12 pm 
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FFIMer

Joined: July 21st, 2011, 9:30 pm
Posts: 704
Location: Brunswick
Nice repot! I have always wanted to fish for Atlantics, Thanks for sharing.

Peter

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"A good game fish is too valuable to be caught only once"
Lee Wulff


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