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PostPosted: July 28th, 2017, 6:49 pm 
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Joined: February 14th, 2007, 1:00 am
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Location: New Hampshire
So I endeavor to explain the past 5 days, which were nothing short of breathtaking…. I’m sitting on a short train ride from Gallivare, Sweden back to Kiruna where it all began 6 days ago, and where I fly out in the morning….

Actually, this trip began around Christmas time, when I got the pass to do a “trip” this summer, while my wife and kids were home in the states, taking a proper French Holiday. I searched far and wide, knowing that I wanted something remote and wild to offset our two years of living in the Parisian Burbs. I interviewed several outfitters and guides, and each initial email started with…. “I am an experienced fly fisherman, and want to catch arctic char in remote areas… I can carry a 40lb pack for 5-7 miles, and my budget is XXXX”. I heard back from two, and after our first chat I knew Daniel Nordvall was the guy. Raised in Northern Sweden, of Sami origin, trained for 18 months (full time) in the Swedish Guide school for mountain skills and fly fishing, with uncles as active reindeer herders, he knew the woods, and he loves to fish. I have not had a better experience with a guide in the world, and that says a lot for a guy who had to spend 5 full days with me, morning, noon and night. Daniel was a perfect guide... knew when to fish, hike, break, make a joke, to be silent and when to pull out the emergency chocolate bar for the last boost to crest the last ridge. He was a great cook and inspired confidence, which we all know is critical. Big thank you to him... and please check him out http://nordvallfishing.com/.

The short story is this… I flew from Paris to Kiruna Sweden, got picked up, spent a night in Gallivare, and from there we drove to the heliport and flew out to northwest Lapland by helicopter, and over 4.5 days we hiked 40 km (24 miles) on the trail between late morning and early afternoon, camped 4 nights, each in a different lake/riverside location, and spent all afternoon, evening, and early morning fishing lakes and rivers for Arctic Char... all of which was between 100 and 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle. The tally between the two of us was well over 3 doz char landed (just shy of 2 doz for me J), ranging from the smallest of 30 cm (12”) to the longest being 60cm (24”) and the heaviest being right at 3kg (6.6lb). Today, I start the journey back to Kiruna on the train, and tomorrow, the three leg journey back to Paris (Frequent Flier Flight). But that is the short story… read on if you want more…. It turned out to be a little long winded, so feel free to pour yourself a long drink before you dig in.

Let me start with a fast story, that I am immensely proud of. Before I left, I had spoken to a colleague who knew Northern Sweden based on her husband’s family lineage. They are Brits, and he has half a rod in the local trout club. He sent me a nice note, with a fly tied by his Swedish father 50 years ago, to be fished in Sweden. It was basically a tan bodied, hackled fly in a size 14 or so… he gave explicit instructions on how and where to fish it “Glassy stream, when they are on the rise, remember to give it a twitch”. So, on our last night, we were on a lake with two inlets (think EO and WO at Indian Pond), and standing on a sandbar at the EO, afforded a look upstream… glassy, calm… risers… Out came the fly, I couldn’t get 4x tippet through the eye, so I went to 5x. 3 or 4 casts, through the alders, twitch, twitch, twitch, and a big wallowing slurp came up at the fly, the game was on. He was a workout for my 5wt, and I was terrified the 5x wouldn’t hold up… when he was just within range to lift and scoop… POP! F&#(!!!!!!, I was horrified I lost the fly. As I pulled my line of the bushes behind me, I saw the hook has straightened… I wasn’t going down that easy…. Bent it back….. cast…. Twitch….. slurp…. Second fish in 10 mins on this fly… how cool…. Now, the hook just needs to hold up. Two good drag singing runs, and he was in the net… MISSION ACCOMPLISHED! A few fast pics to send back to my colleague, and I went to pull the hook to let him go… SNAP! The shank of the hook snapped, half stayed in the fish’s jaw, half stayed on my line. Thank GOD that fly had two last fish in it… and what an honor to send it to its final resting place, where it was born, about 2000km north of where the handoff occurred. I was absolutely beeming and already shared the pics and the good news with him. He was very proud of it, as I think we all are, when we help the cause.

Proof of success
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The prize - 2nd fish, first landed on the heirloom fly
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RIP old Fly
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Now, for those who like the details, here goes...

• The Area

o Flying over this area, it is simply pock marked by a million puddles… at least it seems from the sky… all glacial craters, the fishy ones with depths ranging from 60-100m (180-300ft), that have a bright aqua colored water on the edges, that eventually descend into DEEP dark sapphire blue in their depths. There is not much vegetation to speak of…. Dwarf birch, which make for comfy camp sites, and some hellish bushes, similar to alders that reach head high. The area is wet… really wet, which enables the fabled mosquitos to thrive in the area. The area had just come off of two weeks of solid rain, so the rivers and lakes were full and the ground was moist, and the ice had just cleared on most of the lakes as late as two weeks ago… a few were still iced in. We however totally lucked out on the weather outside of 4 hours of rain on Day 1, which provided some pretty skys, and from then on we had bluebird skies, sunshine from 3AM to 1130PM, light to moderate wind, which was welcomed on the hikes, and temps that ranged from 6 degrees Celsius at night (low 40’s F) to daytime temps touching 22 C (75F). This was abnormal, but a real stroke of luck. The area is a protected national park, populated only by the Sami People who have indigenous people status, who are allowed to live and work in the park. They manage their Reindeer herds and have free rein to fish and gather. Outsiders can only fish within 1km of the trail. Besides that, there is a steady flow of hikers, walking the famous trail, and quick to greet with a smile, a “Hey” or “Hey-ya”, and when returned with a “hello” they are happy to practice their PERFECT English… just like Paris :roll:

Reindeer on the ride to Gallivare... check that box...
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Helicopter view.... lots of water
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Daniel the Guide
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Sebastien the pilot... he knew I was nervous, so kept us laughing.
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• The Hiking

o The hiking was an unexpected upside of the trip. I was happy, and signed up, to walk to get to fishing spots, but I totally underestimated how much I would enjoy the walking part of it. The hiking itself added to the accomplishment feeling, but equally offered the chance to see some amazing scenery. The first day was a short walk of 1.5 hrs, but gained significant elevation, and got the blood flowing, and helped me to get reacquainted with my pack. Day 2 was shorter, with even more elevation. Day 3 was the hottest, longest, and included a wrong turn or two, which was frustrating under the high, hot sun, but nothing a quick snooze couldn’t fix once camp was made. Day 4 was probably the best scenery… walking down to the valley, from our highest lake, seeing the white and gray of the high mountains fade into the lush green of the valley. This is where we won back the 3 days of uphill, losing about 300-400m of elevation going down. We crossed numerous creeks draining the high snow, we cross the snow itself in many places where it remained on the north slopes, and found 2x head high snow packs on July 23rd. That said, with fishing gear included, my pack was close to 55lbs, and I ended up with some hurting feet. It didn’t take long for the wading in 40 degree water to take the edge off the aching feet, knee, hip, or anything else that hurt after the longer hikes… and my wading boots felt like slippers after taking off my hiking boots.
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• The Camping[/url]

o Making and breaking 4 camps made me fall into a deep love affair with my tent, and well thought out packing, we had it down to a 35 minute process. We didn’t need to haul much water, as we drank out of the rivers and lakes. Each tent site was mostly soft, on a bed of dwarf birches, Daniel managed the food that included char (because one died on us), reindeer, sausage, cheese, and of course the obligatory freeze dried packs that are just too easy to avoid. No matter the flavor, they all taste like Knorr Soup… they always have, and I suspect they always will. Camp life was comfy, the bugs were better or worse in some places, the last place being THE worst, and we had to break down and have a proper fire. This is HIGHLY frowned upon in the park, but we were just outside the edge… not to mention, there is NO dead wood… everything is green and wet… but we managed one. There wasn’t a single ugly camp… but I will say, the first two were pretty remarkable. Night 3 was pretty barren… Night 4 felt “touched” but afforded a nice place to watch and wait for the rise to start, and was only 1/2 km to the Taxi stand.

Reindeer and Spuds
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Char for Breakfast
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Sami Carbonara
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Night 5 dinner at the Lodge, Reindeer Tenderloin and Lingdonberries.
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• The Fishing

o Char fishing took a little getting used to, but once it clicked, it worked for me… they are a brookie’s cousin after all, and you all know, I am a streamer/brookie enthusiast. These fish live in lakes that are upwards of 150-200 ft deep, and the big ones eat the little ones. That means, something interesting needs to happen to draw them out of their depths and into catchable range. That “interesting thing” is twofold. First, the wind needs to lay down to flat, glassy calm… then there need to be bugs. We saw brown and olive mayflies, midges were ever present, and some skittering caddis were around. When the conditions were right, they woke up and were on the feed. No matter the size of the fish, the take was always the same, a very subtle tug, like your fly going up and over a rock… like a bonefish take. It took a while to get the feel and to set on something so subtle. The size of the fish couldn't be measured by the take, only by how fast it dove, and how hard it thumped at it tried to bury its head in the rubble. But even the little ones pulled super hard, so the first pass of the red/orange belly was the first sizing opportunity. These fish are super strong, considering they are almost all lake fish, super strong to the point that 3x became the minimum tippet, and I was using a striper rod for freshwater fish! These char grow like bonsai trees. Their window of ice free insects is about 2.5 months of the year, and a 2kg char is estimated to be 25 years old. 3kg can be 35-40 years old. These things are dinosaurs!

o Day 1 – Char are hard to catch
- We were fishing a place likened to Upper Dam… about 1km of moving water between a lake and a sizeable waterfall. It gave nymphing and streamer options, with nice deep moving water. Truth be told we had weather blowing in, it was a cold rain, and I ended the night wearing a down jacket under a shell, and wool hat…. IN LATE JULY!. It never really got calm but we tried hard. By the grace of God alone, I got the first fish, on the last swing at the top of the waterfall… and a nice chunky 1.5 kg (3lb) char came to hand. It was fat and beautiful, orange bellied, and fought great. These fish's weight out play their length. Unfortunately for this one, he went belly up on the release… for no particular reason, and despite seemingly an hour of reviving him, alternating and freezing our hands in the 40 degree current. So, we ate him for breakfast, and I must say, it was pretty remarkably good. We fished until 1230AM or so, and could still tie on a fly without a headlamp while wearing sunglasses. We had showers off and on, but the weather made for a pretty remarkable rainbow/sunset combo. Daniel got a fish too, and we called it a night.

Safe Landing
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The hike
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Camp
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Rainbow full of sound into Fire on the Mountain
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Chilly Sunset
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First Fish
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Airplane Wings
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o Day 2 – Brokedown Palace - Not a long hike, but it felt vertical, I was dogged when we go to the 2nd camp after 3 hours. It was HOT! It was a little lake, 80m deep, with a small trickle into a bigger lake. This was the single best camping spot I have ever seen. I think of it as our Brokedown Palace… I slept with my head 3 ft from shoreline, with the waves lapping, and mountains all around. Simply glorious. We flailed hard from 2-5pm, without so much as a bump (you see, it was windy, a slight wind chop kept them down). Once the guide starts telling you how hard your fish are to catch, you know you’re in trouble, until he cracked the code. On the far bank with a purple and black wooley bugger, he banged a mid-sized fish just as the wind and chop subsided and he called me over. I proceeded to stand on that rock, and cast into a deep blue abyss right off my toes, catch and release 8 of the most Red char of the trip. It was an awesome 3 hours… when they had finally destroyed that wooley bugger, I swapped it for a purple leach, that did the trick (Thank you Brian Denahy for the secret weapon). This fly became the fly for the week, in all colors, as long as there was some colorful fibers in it, red and purple to be exact. The fish in this lake were magnificent with bright red bellies and gill plates. The wind picked up, so we had dinner, and around 10PM ventured back out to the big lake just down the hill, at little more bundled up this time… down jacket and wool hat time. Same fly, but this time the fish were into the shallows hunting. 4 more came to the net, before we called it a night. Now things were clicking.

The Hike – Antlers in tow
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Truckin'
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Brokedown Palace
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Pano of Camp
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The Hot Rock
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RED CHAR!
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Sunset (sort of) over the big lake, around 12AM
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o Day 3 – The long hike - Day 2 had taken a toll on my feet, so day 3 was hard, especially because we had 2 high water crossings (wore wading boots without socks) that devoured my emerging blisters. On the walk, we were stopped by a friendly couple out for a 14 day trek in the park who spotted the rod tubes on our pack. They said they had camped on a lake that was “boiling all night”. That sounded just right… so we trudged on a little further, past our planned stop, and camped high on a bluff, made camp and took a much needed snooze in the heat. It was BUGGY!. This was a long narrow lake, that was a mix of shallow shoals, and then bottomless holes. So we dug in… any time a fish would pop, we’d put a streamer close and try to tease it in. Of course most were just out of range. But, the first one came to the net, and it was CHUNKY… nearly 2kg (4lbs)… this lake didn’t give up many fish… only 3 in total for me, but average of the 3 was 2.4kg or so. Daniel left for a bit to check in with his wife and 6 month old son, and just as he was coming over the bluff from camp, another fish on…. He knew immediately “Big Char” he said, and the fish proceeded to give me a workout, run, tug, pull, swim at me, everything. As it came into view, with its big orange belly and bright orange fins that looked like wings he said “Beautiful BIG char”. It came in the net and hung half way out. 60 cm (25”) and nearly 3 kg, it was a horse. We feared fishing after dinner, for fear of bringing down the average weight. The night was cold at high altitude, and I became thankful that I had a packable down jacket with me. We fished on, and one more came to the net, also in the 2kg class, with a red belly that perfectly match my clearance rack, LL BEAN, down jacket… my wife hates that coat… I now call it Char Belly Red, as opposed to the “fire engine red” that she calls it.

Long walk and lots of snow!
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Snow ball in July
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Camp on the highest lake of the trip
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Pano of Camp at sunset
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First Fish
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The Big Fish – 60 cm (yes, it was taped)
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Pretty last fish
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Color Coordinated
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o Day 4 – It’s all downhill from here – What an awesome hike… we got to go down the OTHER side of the hill, and see the amazing scenery fall from grey and white into green and deep blue, only cut by the frothy white currents of two tributaries where the rivers came into the lake we were going to fish. This was close to our helicopter meeting point for the afternoon of Day 5, so we only had a short hike and a full 1.5 days to explore. Truth be told, this was my least favorite lake… the campsite felt "used" compared to the others, and it was BUGGY! But, we set to work and I a nice char came from the edge of the deep to the purple leach within an hour of arriving. Here we had access to a small raft, which allowed us to row to a nice sand bar, that immediately dropped off into the center of the lake. A few cookie cutter fish came to hand from the deep side of the island, which was good for the tally and the ego, but the big win of the night came in the form of the story I started with… closing the deal on a 50 year old, family heirloom fly. I stayed up late, and casted from in front of camp until 1 AM, but nothing more. I had one day left.

Snow Crossing
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Sliding into the valley
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Pano of the valley
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The last camp on the big lake
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Warming up, and avoiding the skeeters…. Who brought the sun screen?
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First fish of the day – Purple leech strikes again
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o Day 5 – All things must pass – we rose early, skipped breakfast… the countdown was on. I had 7 hours until the helicopter arrived. At 7AM my tent was already hot… the sun was high, bright and strong… not a good sign, I only wanted one more! We had caught fish every day, in every water we dipped a fly into... the streak was on the line. Out in front of camp ate up two hours without a touch. Daniel was content waiting on risers, to put a bend in his handsome Hardy 5wt, I worked east, and set out to explore. I was on the far bank from the two inlets, and I worked my way up the shore, further and further from camp. Each time, rounding a bend to be disappointed, by the shallow, silty bay that would only hold fish on cloudy days or dark nights, there was no depth. I kept walking, to the point I got a little unnerved when I lost sight of our Orange Tent Cluster. If any of the lakes we fished had been fished, this one had been fished. It was near a hut colony, was a midpoint of the park trail, had comfy and well used camping spots…. But most people hate to walk, so I kept walking. First I spooked a partridge (grouse as they call them here) which flew out behind me, and scared the be-jeeeezus out of me… I walked further, and scared something that set off through the brush, sounding like a moose. I never saw it, but later heard that a binoculared observer from the huts on the hill, with whom we would share our heli-taxi out said, “some guy was out on the sand bar, and right behind him popped up a mother and baby moose”… ooopsJ. Around the last bend, at the top of a high point, I saw what I wanted. The convergence of the Lake (fed by the EO) and the point that it met with the WO, and together became the river. From the opposite side of the lake I could see at the bottom of the aqua colored pool of the WO there were 5 large rocks and amongst them were wallowing char... their shadows dark on the sandy bottom and their backs proposing regularly. The only issue was that I left my dry fly set up at camp. So I waltzed across a rocky path that looked like the yellow brick road in the sun, and went to work from a sturdy sandbar at the outlet. Fresh leader, fresh fly, first cast…. 40 ft short... damn... The bottom was pure silt, and I was terrified to get eaten up by quicksand mud. I stripped some more line, cast, 20” short. In the end, I laid out what I thought was the last good cast that my tired arm had left in it. Finally, I was in moving water, the fly landed high on the far rock, and swung perfectly in front of the 5 rocks that these wallowing beasts were using as cover. Nada… What the Hell! I needed one more fish, my last fish, and they weren’t coming easy this day, and I burned half the day getting here. Same cast as before, twitched the leach and “TAP”. I swore I hung up on a rock… and then the rock charged. Twice I saw my backing on this fish. The firstly wasn’t so impressive, because I only had about 10’ of line left on my reel from the long casts. The second was heart stopping, because it was within 20’ of me, and I saw his size…. Mostly his girth, and certainly his fins and tail. BIG ONE, and I was all on my own! The tussle played out, he wove through rocks, buried his head in the sand , and gave me a full blown workout. I risked life and limb in the silt to net him, and almost died when I saw him fill up the net. He was long, but more so, he was fat. His tail was as wide as my hand with spread fingers. His fins were as long as my fingers… he was a beast! He was also very tired, and I wasn’t willing to eat to eat this 40 yr old fish. One char meal was enough. In between reviving him, I got some pictures an sent him on his way. My heart was pounding, and I sat on that bar, in the hot sun with my legs in the icy water, and enjoyed the view, and couldn’t believe that I actually got a fairy tale ending.


In the net – HOLY $hit
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Glamor Shot – Look at those fins!
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Tail Envy
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Off he goes
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Taxi Stand
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Taxi Ride
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• The Gear

o Fishing
 I brought 3 rods, in the end I only need 2, and given that I was fishing deep streamers, I could have made do with one. That would have saved me a few precious pounds in the pack. The one I used most was a soft 8wt that I made at Cote’s Rod Building Class, on an inexpensive soft blank. I told Daniel it was a 7 wt, so he wouldn’t laugh at me, and it is probably closer to a 7 then an 8. I needed every ounce of this rod, even on the mid-sized fished, especially to land them fast and let them go. Every fish bent that rod to the limit, and i like to play them fast. It was teamed with a 8wt sink tip, and reel, with saltwater quality drag that was singing on most fish. The other was a 10’ Temple Fork BVK, which I brought for nymphing. My stream 5wt didn’t even come out of the tube for fear of breaking it. These fish are super strong.
 For flies, it was all about leaches, which probably became a self-fulfilling prophecy. Naturally, I tied about 20 doz flies for the trip, and only ended up using 2 doz leaches. 3x flouro, straight off the sink tip, and mono loop knots. This was pretty straight forward and in comfort zone.
 My new G3s kept me warm and dry, and combated the Lapland alders with grace. I carried my Simms guide boots, which when wet added about 5 lbs to my pack… Daniel wore sneakers with his Simms, the wading was really easy, the sneakers were a good idea.
 I streamlined to my first Coldwater Products chest pack… I am going to start using that more. The small size forces simplicity, which I am coming to appreciate. Even with streamlining, I had way too much fishing stuff which made up 45% of my pack weight. I could have planned this better.
o Tent – Marmot Limelite 3, I have had it for 5 years, and just waterproofed the rain fly for the first time for this trip. This tent is spacious for the people, has two vestibules for gear to keep dry, and stands up in about 8 minutes. I have just rekindled my love affair with my tent. It was heavier than I would have liked, but it was worth it to have the space, and it provided a nice “bug free” zone, and a new tent wasn't in the budget.

o Bug Deterrent – I drenched two shirts, 2 pants, 2 bandanas, 1 baseball cap, 1 wool cap in Permethrin. I am 100%, whole heartedly a believer in this stuff. While Daniel had 100 bugs on his hat, I had none. They were all around by the thousands, millions even, but I had a little force field to maintain my sanity. It lasted all week. This was $12 well spent. For exposed skin, the Ben’s 100 worked, but certainly not for 10 hours as advertised… I had to re-up every 3 hours or so, but only used it around dusk. Anyone notice that deet increases ones susceptibility to sun?

• A few takeaways
o Santa left me a little present on Day 1 and Day 3… after all, we were right in his back yard… two nicely formed, but small reindeer antler sheds. They were light and worth carrying, something to fuel a story and keep the North Pole magic alive for the kids…. Complete with a Sami carved birch burl cup for each… these are hanging on every hikers pack.
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o People in northern Sweden love their knives. The Sami knives especially. They are holstered on a Reindeer leather belt loop, they hang low, below the waist bands of the heavy rucksacks that are basically Swedish Samsonite. The handles are usually carved wood or reindeer antler, and the sheath is usually leather with a wood liner, that "clicks" just right to lock it in. The fancy ones have some antler decoration on them… I bought one, made by a local crafts man in Gallivare. The handle and sheeth are birch burl, and the handle is tipped with a slice of antler.

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AS is the sign of Alf Samuelsson who made the knife
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• The Sami culture is really interesting, particularly around their domestication of Reindeer for all of their agricultural and gathering purposes, in addition to their food, fur and antlers (more like native americans and buffalo). I went to the Sami Museum in Gallivare, which was quite cool. Their lifestyle resembled the Inuits a little bit, due to location and climate mostly, and unfortunately they have endured many of the same hardships of our Native Americans at the hands of their pioneering countrymen.

The knives
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Traditional Dress
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Hunter/Gathering Gear
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• No matter the forecast... don't forget sunblock. Between us, we had 120lbs of gear, and no sunscreen.... and I got roasted... oops.



All in all, I can't speak highly enough of the quality of this experience. The park, terrain, hiking, fishing, people and logistics all went off without a hitch.... the fact that the last fish was the biggest fish, that came in the most memorable way, with only two hours left on the clock is simply a fairy tale ending... and on that note... they all lived happily ever after... except for one... and it was delicious.

Sorry for all of the hot air, it was as much for me to sort out and document the trip as much as anything... hope you liked it.

TGIF

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PostPosted: July 28th, 2017, 8:38 pm 
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Great report and a great trip.

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PostPosted: July 28th, 2017, 9:28 pm 
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North and Char. 2 magic, and my favorite words!


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PostPosted: July 28th, 2017, 10:18 pm 
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Vermonter wrote:
North and Char. 2 magic, and my favorite words!


Right up your alley Bob.

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PostPosted: July 29th, 2017, 7:31 am 
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What an amazing adventure. Thank you so much for taking time to write and post this. I've read it twice and looked at the pics a lot more.


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PostPosted: July 29th, 2017, 8:14 am 
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Quite possibly the best TR of all time. What a cool adventure & thanks for sharing.

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PostPosted: July 29th, 2017, 10:59 am 
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The Sami Knives are very interesting, I'm familiar with the blade design but the sheaths are strange. I wonder what the hooked bottom is all about, got to do some research.

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PostPosted: July 29th, 2017, 12:20 pm 
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TGIF,
Most wonderful. What a great trip. You're very lucky to have been able to experience both the culture and the area. And you presented it in both pictures and prose to excite everyones intrigue.
Now you've really whet my appetite to get back to Sweden.

Ron

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PostPosted: July 30th, 2017, 10:37 am 
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Hi All,

Indeed, it was a memorable excursion for sure! Equally, thank you to anyone who hunkered down and read it all... admittedly, it is a little verbose.

Dryflie - I was told that the hooks on the sheath all for a better grip when drawing the blade... particularly when you can hook it on something, of on your leg when kneeling, you can do it with one hand. They said the grip was important, particularly because they are used to working with cold hands or when wearing mittens. I happened to be there during the 6 tolerable weeks, and my 5 days was downright balmy.

One other thing i forgot to mention... I make no assertion of being in good shape AT ALL, but 70 degrees and sunny is pretty awesome. For the locals that spend half their year in darkness, and where the low 60's is the average, this heat wave was really hard on them. Even Daniel, for all his time in the mountains was really dogged by the heat. Interesting to see how we have all acclimated differently.

The next adventure... getting home to see my clan, who I've missed dearly this summer. You can imagine how empty the house feels without a 5, 4 and 2 year old running ram shot. 5 days and counting down to the first hugs in the driveway.

TGIF

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"Fishermen...spending their lives in the fields and woods...are often in a more favorable mood for observing her, in the intervals of their pursuits, than philosophers or poets even, who approach her with expectation." - Thoreau


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PostPosted: July 30th, 2017, 11:40 am 
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FFIM-aholic

Joined: February 14th, 2007, 1:00 am
Posts: 1168
Location: New Hampshire
ONe more story... totally forgot... Since I had started talking to Daniel, I was telling him that most of my experience is fishing in Maine for Brook Trout. He neither knew where Maine was, nor what a brook trout was. But as we traded fishing stories, mine often started wtih.... "well, in Maine.... " to the point that some day he'd like to fish there.

Then, after a totally frustrating afternoon of Day 1, and an unprofitable mornign of Day 2... he said.... "Hey, you got any Parmancheenee Belle's?".... he continued.... "The Char LOVE Parmancheenee Belles".

Well... that sealed the deal, I walked him through everything I knew about that fly, the Lake, the rivers in and out, every fish I'd caught there... etc.

Can you believe he even knew how to pronounce it? :lol:

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"Fishermen...spending their lives in the fields and woods...are often in a more favorable mood for observing her, in the intervals of their pursuits, than philosophers or poets even, who approach her with expectation." - Thoreau


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PostPosted: July 31st, 2017, 9:14 am 
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Joined: July 21st, 2011, 9:30 pm
Posts: 704
Location: Brunswick
Wow... that's about all I can think of after reading every word of this. Probably the most true meaning of epic that can think of.

Nicely done,

Petet

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"A good game fish is too valuable to be caught only once"
Lee Wulff


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PostPosted: July 31st, 2017, 4:30 pm 
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Joined: May 16th, 2013, 10:33 am
Posts: 82
Location: Norridgewock Maine
just plain awesome. those Char are beautiful fish and the arctic countryside looks just as beautiful. great TR


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PostPosted: July 31st, 2017, 4:39 pm 
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Joined: December 2nd, 2001, 1:00 am
Posts: 3257
Location: Vassalboro, Maine
The KING of all T/Rs !!!!!!! Almost Foley-esque!

Hutch

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Summer! Fishing is on- go now! (you have permission...)


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PostPosted: July 31st, 2017, 11:19 pm 
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Joined: August 28th, 2002, 12:00 am
Posts: 1257
Location: Standish, ME
OUT - F'ING - STANDING! Our little adventure is going to be a yawner - but the beer will be good! Can't vouch for the company ;)


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